Sunday, June 21, 2009

Something In The Air

I've always imagined creative ideas as these things that are kind of hovering around in the air above our heads, looking for a place to land. God knows I've had a few good ideas land on me that I wasn't fully equipped to articulate, and this being the case, they flew away and appeared somewhere else as a barely recognized permutation I would've never dreamed of. There seems to be something up there, over there, inside us. Maybe I'm not intelligent enough to grasp the vast randomness and chaos that appears to be order, and I'm allowing myself to get smoked by the coincidence and the appearance of patterns. I don't know, but I have noticed other incidents of the appearance of some other kind of super-ordinate connectedness. For instance: although I was vocally opposed to the second Iraq war when it began, I felt something like a war-sugar-rush penetrating me when I turned on the T.V., talked to people, or just thought about the subject. The war was wrong, I was sure. I was against it. On another level however, I wanted it.

I wasn't the only one who felt this way. Again, non-scientific talk here. Pure anecdote: I knew others at the time of the push for war and have talked to others since who acknowledged the same increase in their Thanatos levels. Some kind of widespread madness tainted everything. Some suffered from larger doses. I saw this weird connectedness on the war issue, and felt a weaker strain of it during the high point of the Tea Party protests. On the positive side, there was something decidedly beautiful saturating the air for awhile after September Eleventh, 2001. You can experience smaller versions of this nice kind of saturation at a concert, or in a church, or just on a family picnic.

I'm not sure what to call it, this something that injects all of these weird vibes and synchroncities and ideas into us, but I'm tempted to call it something.

8 comments:

Lodo Grdzak said...

What makes you bring up September 11th and Iraq War? I mean, why now?

Spencer Troxell said...

Just observing a collective response. Thinking about the super-conscious, if there is such a thing.

Lodo Grdzak said...

Strange/odd/interesting transition from your opening idea to the Sep. 11th-Iraq War idea. Guess it was that 'where do these ideas come from?" concept that brought to your mind that transition. I often felt that way watching Jimi Hendrix perform. He seems to simply be a conduit for a kind-of transcendent energy flowing through him. In regards to the Iraq War--dont forget George W./Dick Cheney and their daily "Weapons of Mass Destruction" that they kept shoving down our throats. That may have influenced your opinion just a bit. And when Colin Powell supported the argument, that sealed the deal. As for myself, Im so damn embarrassed for my support of Iraq II that I will always despise Republicans (not that I didn't already). They're the cocksucker war party, no doubt about that. Reagan--war. Bush I --war. Bush II--war. Think Sara Palin would get us into a war? Think Newt Gingrich would get us into a war? Think Jeb Bush would get us into a war? We already know the answer dont we? A-holes, everyone of them.

Spencer Troxell said...

I worried a little bit about that transition. I was originally going to talk about Albert Brooks's 'Looking For Comedy In The Muslim World' as an idea that landed on the wrong man, but some how ended up talking about some kind of over-soul. I'll try to be clearer in the next post.

Oh, yes. The propaganda machine is important in creating a mass feeling. After seeing how John McCain has responded to the situation in Iran right now (Get'Em! Kill'Em! Sell'em Weapons!) has reinforced my Obama vote a thousand more times.

World politics is not cowboys and indians.

GbiZ said...

Do you think its hypocritical what youre advocating when you consider how hard you are on religion?

Spencer Troxell said...

No, because I'm not advocating anything. Just sharing an observation.

Willie Y said...

After 9/11 and the start of the Iraq war the feeling I was getting was that now all of us were on the same page, a collective agreement on what we should do. As time went on we found out that the lead up to the Iraq war was, let say, not to honest. But for that short time in history we were all one.

Spencer Troxell said...

I had that feeling too. These collective feelings seem to be pretty easy to manipulate, don't they? Next time a big event leads to a feeling of national unity, hopefully more of us will stand one off, and examine the situation more critically.